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Designer to Watch| Anrealage Fall 2015-16 Ready-to-Wear Collection La Black Époque

The Anrealage Fall 2015-16 Ready-to-Wear show was one not to be missed. When we entered the venue we noticed that everyone that support Asian designers and advent guard fashion was in the building. As we waited in anticipation we were mesmerized when the show actually started.

La Black Époque

We choose Anrealage as a Designer to Watch, because  the Japanese label has a cult following in such a short time with only two collections under its belt.    Take a minute to sit with the gallery of images from the runway above. Even though our photographer commented it was very dark to capture the true essence of the collection, without being in the room at the time.  He tried to bring the very important element, which where the visuals prints on the tailored masculine cuts of the creative director Kunihiko Morinaga. The creative director has an interest in optical illusions. His second Paris show last focused on light and dark.  It was a laser shows were you had to pay attention or you would miss the impressions when the flashing lights shined in pitch black darkens and on clothes.

 

Designer to Watch| Anrealage Fall 2015-16 Ready-to-Wear Collection La Black Époque

The Anrealage sculptural silhouettes were cut in a special black fabric that revealed a printed texture only under ultraviolet lights, or had needle-punched white circles—like a spotlight projection—splattered across the front. To spotlight the depth of darkness, everything was black, including models’ faces, a heavy stroke that made the atmosphere ultra dramatic. The collection consisted of long skirts, oversized sailor jackets, wool ponchos and a flower and checked prints. A very British collection crossed with Japanese styles.
The age of the Asian designer is back and was premiered during Paris Fashion week. The collection stayed true to why we yearn for everything Asian fashion design. Minimalism, advent guard black garments that are also intricately cut. Morinaga, like some of his fellow Japanese designers, are attracted to the conceptual, concepts of fashion design. The collection was complete from start to finish. It stayed with in the same concept, monotony, stiff garments,  filled with pieces constructed of rounded and womanly silhouettes,  in a Belle Époque thumb from start to finish. Consumers are not afraid of a little stiffness to the garments;  a very fashion forward collection. The collection seemed sturdy and seemed as if they would age beautifully. Fashion seems to be returning to the dark ages, were black is the colour of the fashion elite. If you look on the streets for a little street style black is the new black. This was the kind of stuff that can really push fashion forward.

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Photos by Rudy de Monteiro

 

 

 

 

About the author

Charlotte is an urban New Yorker who has lived in London, Paris & Morocco. She has an MBA in Management and Economics of Luxury Brands and Fashion and her BFA from the New School. She calls herself the dyslexic writer living between London & Paris. Digital Fashion & Lifestyle Architect ?:ChaChaNyc007

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